News & Notes

January, 2018

January 23, 2018

'Significant progress:' Where Nashville's transit cheerleaders see momentum    

Middle Tennessee's most vocal advocates for mass transit are back, updating their annual scorecard of the region's progress toward increasing its mobility options.

Moving Forward, which is backed by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce, released its 2018 scorecard Monday, one day before Metro Council is slated to hold its critical second vote on Mayor Megan Barry's mass-transit funding referendum.

And while the group cites "significant progress" in the region's quest for mass transit, Moving Forward is sticking to its initiative to support breaking ground on the region's first rapid-transit project by the end of 2020. In Nashville's peer cities, it historically has taken seven or more years from a plan's inception to break ground on a project, according to the group.


January 23, 2018

Murfreesboro firefighters heading up door-to-door census count  

If you haven't filled out the city of Murfreesboro's Special Census yet, a uniformed Murfreesboro firefighter may be knocking on your door.

Currently, Murfreesboro Fire Rescue Department members are going door-to-door to help the city collect names and complete an accurate count of households who have not filled out and returned the special census form by mail or online.   

The population of Murfreesboro was last certified in 2011 by the State of Tennessee at 109,031, after an annexation special census count. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the 2016 population for Murfreesboro to be 131,947. Based on the current number of households, along with building permits issued for new residential dwellings, the 2017-2018 population likely exceeds the 2016 estimate.  

“The Special Census certifies the city’s growth in population,” said Planning Director Gary Whitaker. “We believe the City has added at least 20,000 new residents since the last census and that could mean an additional $2.9 million per year in state-shared funding.”

 

January 18, 2018

T-DOT Awards $6-Million Grant For New Rover Home

Murfreesboro is awarded a $6-million Tennessee Department Of Transportation grant for a new transit facility and office at the corner of West Main Street and Bridge Avenue.

It was a Competitive Transit Capital Grant to cover the final design and construction of the new center.

When completed, the Rover bus full-service facility will cost $11.5 million. Murfreesboro's Transit Center will include a 12,700 square foot garage and office complex. Officials estimate the project should be completed by 2021.


January 16, 2018

MPO Transportation Policy Board Meeting Canceled

The January 17th meeting of the MPO's Transportation Policy Board has been canceled due to weather. The MPO's annual public hearing will be held during the next regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. 

January 16, 2018

MPO Transportation Policy Board Meeting Canceled

The January 17th meeting of the MPO's Transportation Policy Board has been canceled due to weather. The MPO's annual public hearing will be held during the next regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. 

January 16, 2018

MPO Transportation Policy Board Meeting Canceled

The January 17th meeting of the MPO's Transportation Policy Board has been canceled due to weather. The MPO's annual public hearing will be held during the next regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. 

January 12, 2018

Nashville council overwhelmingly endorses holding referendum on Barry’s $5.4B transit plan

Nashville Metro Council members gave their overwhelming endorsement Thursday night to hold a public referendum on Mayor Megan Barry’s transit proposal, setting up likely council approval in the coming weeks to add the measure to the May ballot.  A special council committee composed of the entire body voted 29 to 1, with one abstention, to recommend that the transit referendum be added to the May ballot.  Barry wants votes to approve raising four taxes, including sales taxes, to pay for a $5.4 billion transit infrastructure plan.  Although the full body wasn’t present, the wide margin is a clear sign Barry’s ordinance has the votes it needs when it goes before the council on a critical second of three readings on Tuesday.  Final council approval would come in February.


January 11, 2018

Nashville transit supporters show forceful, organized front at council hearing on mayor's plan 

The highly organized and coordinated campaign helping Mayor Megan Barry's mass transit push was on display Tuesday during a marathon public hearing at the Metro Council that saw proponents of her controversial referendum proposal easily outnumber critics.

Backers packed the room early. It allowed them to dominate much of the hearing to urge support for the mayor's proposed referendum, which seeks to increase four taxes to pay for a $5.4 billion transit infrastructure proposal.

Speakers stretched far outside the chambers to weigh in on a plan that would be anchored by light rail along major corridors. By the time the night concluded, Nashvillians, representing both sides of the debate, had talked for nearly three and a half hours.

 

January 11, 2018

Transit and Affordability Taskforce Presents Final Recommendations to Mayor Megan Barry 

The Mayor’s Transit and Affordability Taskforce, led by former Mayor Bill Purcell and Davidson County Clerk Brenda Wynn, has delivered recommendations to Mayor Megan Barry on how Nashville can develop policies and programs to support small businesses and cost-burdened residents along proposed high-capacity transit corridors. 

“The commitment of these Taskforce members to our people and our neighborhoods, like that of our Mayor, is unquestioned,” said Mayor Purcell. “There was broad consensus to the procedural and substantive proposals made. While there was not unanimous agreement on all specific ways in which to achieve our goals, the Taskforce believes that by the time this transit program is fully implemented, the need for affordable housing in our city must be fully met. We know this will not be accomplished by new transit-oriented development districts or the transit plan alone, but we all agree these recommendations will serve as an essential component.” 

January 11, 2018

Economic Development Agency executive director: 270 people a month are moving to Gallatin

Gallatin is growing. All it takes is a short drive down Nashville Pike or Highway 386 to see that. But the rate at which the city is growing surprised even James Fenton, executive director of the Gallatin Economic Development Agency.

Fenton, who spoke Monday at a Gallatin Chamber of Commerce luncheon, said he could not believe when he learned that on average, 270 people a month are moving to Gallatlin. 

With growth comes several challenges, Fenton explained, traffic being among the most significant. 

“It’s not going to get better,” said Fenton. “But we are working diligently to make sure it doesn’t get worse. The city is investing tens of millions of dollars into roads … to make sure that doesn’t get any worse.”



Media Relations

Media Inquiries and Requests for More Information:

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